Category Archives

86 Articles

Lodestone

Lodestone

Lodestone is an accessible peak in the Arthur Ranges. From the top there are excellent views of the surrounding countryside and all the way out to Tasman Bay. While the tramp starts at the same place as the Mt Arthur walk (in Flora Carpark), it is slightly shorter. So if you’re short of timeLodestone makes an excellent alternative.

List Status Official
Elevation 1,462?m?(4,797?ft)
Location/List South Island, New Zealand
Region Nelson/Marlborough
Location Coordinates 41? 10′ 13″ S, 172? 44′ 48″ E
Nearest Town/s Motueka, Nelson
Range Arthur Range
Geology Sedimentary
Recommended Route
Duration Help.gif 4-5 hours (return)
Distance 6.6?km?(4.1?mi)
Start/End Points Flora Carpark
Difficulty Help.gif Medium
Track conditions Help.gif Track, Marked Route, Steep embankments, Stream/River Crossings
Season Help.gif November to April
Sights Add this data , Views of Mt Arthur and Tablelands, Tasman Bay, Waimea Basin
Hazards Alpine weather , possible snow/ice in winter, stream crossing

Getting There

By Car

From the main road through Motueka, turn toward Murchison (marked by a green sign). Follow the road through Motueka and through the countryside. You will come to a sign to Mt Arthur Track. Follow the sign and turn right accross the Alexander Bluff Bridge, and then left on to Motueka West Bank Road, which has a Mt Arthur Track Sign (22 km). After 11 km you reach an intersection. The sign points straight on, so continue following the sign. The road changes to a gravel road. Follow Graham Valley South Branch Road. For the last 6 km the road is corrugated, rough and very steep in places. A 4WD vehicle is recommended (although when we arrived at the top, there was a vast assortment vehicle types – whether they got safely down again is another question!).

Google Earth Map

NZ Topographic Map

Our Recommended Route

The track to the summit of Lodestone begins from the Flora Saddle carpark, where there is a shelter and a toilet. The Flora Shelter contains a number of interesting informational panels, and was opened by Prime Minister Jim Bolger in 1996.

You can climb Lodestone as part of a circuit, so follow the signs directly up the Loadstone Ridge to the top of Lodestone. The track travels through beech forest before breaking through the bushline. There are some steep sections to negotiate especially near the top of the summit. It takes approximately 2 hours to reach the summit. Views at the top are fantastic and include Mt Arthur, Gordons Pyramid, Tasman Bay and the Waimea Basin.

You can either return from the summit the way you came, or continue down in a circuit via Flora Hut. To do this, follow the poled route over the summit to the bushline on the south western corner of Lodestone. Follow the track which leads down a forested ridge toward Flora Hut. Just by Flora Hut you’ll need to cross a stream to get to the hut itself (Quartz Creek). If you feel like a snack, Flora Hut is a nice place to rest as there are picnic tables located there. From Flora Hut follow the track back to the carpark. It will take approximately 2 hours to walk from the summit to the carpark.

Height Profile

Lodestone-2d.jpg

Weather and Webcam Links

External Links

References

Daywalks-cover.jpg Day Walks in New Zealand: 100 Great Tracks (Bird’s Eye Guides), Shaun Barnett, Craig Potton Publishing (2007), See pages 108-108

Key Summit

Key Summit is a small 918m summit accessible off the western end of Routeburn Track, 85 kms from Te Anau. The Routeburn Track takes 3 days to complete, but the walk to Key Summit itself is only a 3 hour return journey. The summit itself is home to tarns and an alpine wetland, as well as views of the Darran Mountains and the Hollyford Valley.

List Status Official
Elevation 918?m?(3,012?ft)
Location/List South Island, New Zealand
Region Otago/Southland
Location Coordinates 44? 48′ 54″ S, 168? 7′ 39″ E
Nearest Town/s Anau Te Anau
Range Livingstone Mountains
Recommended Route
Duration Help.gif 3 hours (return)
Distance 6.4?km?(4?mi)
Start/End Points The Divide, SH94
Difficulty Help.gif Medium
Track conditions Help.gif Track, Unmarked Route
Season Help.gif Summer/Autumn
Sights 360 views of Fiordland
Hazards Alpine weather , exposed

Getting There

By Car

From Te Anau take the Te Anau to Milford Sound road (SH94). The Divide is just north of Lake Fergus and Lake Lochie. There are a shelter, carpark, and toilets at The Divide.

Public Transport

As Key Summit is located on the Routeburn Track, there are plenty of shuttle options from Te Anau or Queenstown. Try one of the following links:

Google Earth Map

NZ Topographic Map

Our Recommended Route

The walk to Key Summit starts from The Divide, which is the lowest east/west crossing of the South Alps, at 532m. From The Divide, the Routeburn Track sidles around the northern end of the Livingstone Range, and through a mossy silver beech forest. An hour into the walk, a signpost indicates the turn off to Key Summit, and from here the track zig-zags up to above the bushline. A boardwalk then guides you around an interpretative walk at the summit.

Height Profile

Key Summit-2d.jpg

Weather and Webcam Links

External Links

References

Daywalks-cover.jpg Day Walks in New Zealand: 100 Great Tracks (Bird’s Eye Guides), Shaun Barnett, Craig Potton Publishing (2007), See pages 166-167

Isobel, Mt

Mt Isobel, from near Hanmer Springs

As the crow flies, the summit of Mt Isobel is only about 4km from the popular tourist town of Hanmer Springs. Hanmer Springs is home to some wonderful hot pools, and the short four hour hike up Mt Isobel is a great precursor to a relaxing afternoon swim. The summit gives great views of Hanmer Springs, and the walk itself is well marked, and reasonably straighforward in summer conditions.

List Status Official
Elevation 1,319?m?(4,327?ft)
Location/List South Island, New Zealand
Region Canterbury
Location Coordinates 42? 28′ 56″ S, 172? 50′ 52″ E
Nearest Town/s Hanmer Springs
Range Hanmer Range
Geology Sedimentary
Recommended Route
Duration Help.gif 4 hours (return)
Distance 9.8?km?(6.1?mi)
Start/End Points Jacks pass
Difficulty Help.gif Medium
Track conditions Help.gif Track, Marked Route, Steep embankments, Scree/Scoria
Season Help.gif November to April
Sights Rivers , Trig, views of Hanmer Springs and Clarence River
Hazards Alpine weather, Snow, Ice , scree slope

Getting There

By Car

From Hanmer Springs, drive up Clarence Valley Road. You will pass the first track to Mt Isobel which is marked by a sign at the junction with Pawsons Road.

To do the shorter walk (as described on this page) continue up Clarence Valley Road until you reach Jacks Pass. The start of the track is at Jacks Pass and is marked by a green sign on the righthand side of the road. There is a carparking area on the lefthand side of the road.

Google Earth Map

NZ Topographic Map

Our Recommended Route

From Jacks Pass, the track winds through subalpine vegetation and up on to a ridge. The track is well formed and marked with poles. The track undulates a little along the ridge, and you will then arrive at the head of a pretty stream valley. Up to your left the poled route guides the way up the steep scree slope, which is the only really tricky part of the tramp. Walking poles are of use here, especially on the way down. Shortly after the top of the scree slope you will descend a little and come to a signpost which indicates the way to Mt Isobel, and also the way to the track which goes back to Pawsons Rd. Allow about 1 hour to this junction.

From the signpost the tracks gradually climbs along the ridge and up to the summit trig. Just beyond the trig, there is a wide, flat summit area, which is a perfect picnic spot on a fine day. Make sure you walk around the summit, to make the most of the great views of Hanmer Springs and the mountains and valleys surrounding Mt Isobel.

In all it is approximately 1.5 to 2 hours to the trig from Jacks Pass. The time to return to your car is slightly quicker, but remember to take care down the scree slope.

Images

700pxIsobelstart.jpg

700pxIsobelscree.jpg

700pxIsobeltrig.jpg

700pxIsobelview.jpg

393pxIsobelhanmersprings.jpg

Weather and Webcam Links

External Links

 

Iron, Mt

Aerial photo of Mt Iron – Courtesy of DOC, Wanaka

Mt Iron is located right across the road from Puzzle World, 2 kilometres west of Wanaka. Climbing this rocky, glacier created peak after a trip to Puzzle World makes for a great day out.

For more information on this walk, see the DOC Mt Iron page

List Status Official
Elevation 548?m?(1,798?ft)
Location/List South Island, New Zealand
Region Otago/Southland
Location Coordinates 44? 41′ 36″ S, 169? 9′ 54″ E
Nearest Town/s Wanaka, Queenstown
Recommended Route
Duration Help.gif 1.5 hours (return)
Distance 4.5?km?(2.8?mi)
Start/End Points Mt Iron Track Carpark, SH84
Difficulty Help.gif Easy
Track conditions Help.gif Track
Season Help.gif All year
Sights Views , 360 degree views around Wanaka

Google Earth Map

NZ Topographic Map

Height Profile

Iron, Mt-2d.jpg

Weather and Webcam Links

Herbert, Mt

Mt Herbert is the highest point of Banks Peninsula, at 920m. A walk up Mt Herbert is accessible via public transport from Lyttleton, and also be combined with a trip the summit of nearby Mt Bradley.

List Status Official
Elevation 920?m?(3,018?ft)
Location/List South Island, New Zealand
Region Canterbury
Location Coordinates 43? 41′ 23″ S, 172? 44′ 29″ E
Nearest Town/s Christchurch
Range Banks Peninsula Summit
Geology Volcano
Recommended Route
Duration Help.gif 4-8 hours (return or one-way, depending on the track taken)
Distance 15.5?km?(9.6?mi)
Start/End Points Gebbies Pass, Diamond Harbour, Orton Bradley Park or Port Levy Purau Bay saddle
Difficulty Help.gif Easy
Track conditions Help.gif Track, Marked Route
Season Help.gif Nov to July – closed for lambing August-October
Sights Views around Banks Peninsula, Lyttleton Harbour, Southern Alps, the ‘Remarkable Dykes’
Hazards Mist , Steep bluffs

Getting There

By Car

If starting from Gebbies Pass, drive from Christcurch via Governors Bay and at Teddington turn right to reach Gebbies Pass. If starting from Orton Bradley Park, Diamond Harbour, or Port Levy Purau Bay saddle, drive from Christcurch via Governors Bay and at Teddington turn left and continue around the coast until you reach these locations.
Public Transport

If starting or finishing from Diamond Harbour, Black Cat Cruisesrun a regular ferry service from Lyttleton to Diamond Harbour.

Google Earth Map

NZ Topographic Map

Our Recommended Route

A trip up Mt Herbert can be completed via a number of different routes, and could also be combined with a walk to the summit of Mt Bradley. The routes are as follows:

  • Return walk from Kaituna Valley, via Packhorse Hut: 4-6 hours return (closed for lambing Aug ? Oct).

DOC Description: “This track is well sign-posted and passes the farm, following vehicle tracks up a bush-filled valley before climbing onto a big spur. It then follows the spur for some distance before reaching a farm track past Parkinsons Bush Reserve. This leads to the saddle and historic stone hut, well situated for the views.”

  • One-way walk from Gebbies Pass, via Packhorse Hut, Mt Herbert, and finish at Diamond Harbour: 5-6 hours

This route takes in both Mt Herbert and Mt Bradley. As it is one-way, you will need arrange transport at the end of the walk (e.g. have someone to pick you up, or take the ferry back to Lyttleton). After starting at Gebbies Pass, follow the track to the Packhorse Hut. From Packhorse Hut, the track angles up Mt Bradley (855 m). Do not attempt to go up if it is misty as there are bluffs on the Lyttleton side of Mt Bradley. Continue on to Mt Herbert, via a saddle and a Day Shelter. Mt Herbert is the highest point on Banks Peninsula at 920 m.

Views from Mt Bradley and Mt Herbert extend from Lyttleton Harbour and Banks Peninsula through to the Southern Alps. From Mount Herbert continue directly down to Diamond Harbour to complete the walk.

Of course, you could also simply return from either of the peaks and make this a return walk also.

  • Return or loop walk from Orton Bradley Park to Mt Bradley, and return via same route or alternative track back to Orton Bradley Park: 5-7 hours.

Route Options

The DOC Banks Peninsula Conservation Walks brochure outlines a variety of options for walking on Banks Peninsula.

Height Profile

Herbert, Mt-2d.jpg

Weather and Webcam Links

External Links

References

South island weekend tramps-cover.jpg South Island Weekend Tramps (Bird’s Eye Guides), Nick Groves, Craig Potton Publishing, 2003, See pages 94-96

Banks Peninsula – A Guide to the Bays and Beaches, All Walking Tracks, Mark Pickering, Mark Pickering Publishing, 1999, pp 15-16.

Gordons Pyramid

Gordons Pyramid is located in the Kahurangi National Park, near Mt Arthur. It can be climbed as a long day trip or as part of a circuit where you stay in one of the nearby huts. From the top there are excellent views of the surrounding countryside. Some of the tracks in the area connecting Gordons Pyramid are not well marked, so it should not be attempted in poor weather.

List Status Official
Elevation 1,489?m?(4,885?ft)
Location/List South Island, New Zealand
Region Nelson/Marlborough
Location Coordinates 41? 11′ 29″ S, 172? 40′ 47″ E
Nearest Town/s Motueka, Nelson
Range Arthur Range
Geology Sedimentary
Recommended Route
Duration Help.gif 9 hours (return)
Distance 20.0?km?(12.4?mi)
Start/End Points Flora Carpark
Difficulty Help.gif Hard
Track conditions Help.gif Track, Marked Route, Steep embankments
Season Help.gif Nov-April
Sights Views of Mt Arthur and Tablelands
Hazards Alpine weather, Snow, Ice

Getting There

By Car

From the main road through Motueka, turn toward Murchison (marked by a green sign). Follow the road through Motueka and through the countryside. You will come to a sign to Mt Arthur Track. Follow the sign and turn right accross the Alexander Bluff Bridge, and then left on to Motueka West Bank Road, which has a Mt Arthur Track Sign (22 km). After 11 km you reach an intersection. The sign points straight on, so continue following the sign. The road changes to a gravel road. Follow Graham Valley South Branch Road. For the last 6 km the road is corrugated, rough and very steep in places. A 4WD vehicle is recommended (although when we arrived at the top, there was a vast assortment vehicle types – whether they got safely down again is another question!).

Google Earth Map

NZ Topographic Map

Our Recommended Route

Our recommended route describes a single long day walk to the summit of Gordons Pyramid.

The track to the summit of Gordons Pyramid begins from the Flora Saddle carpark, where there is a shelter and a toilet. The Flora Shelter contains a number of interesting informational panels, and was opened by Prime Minister Jim Bolger in 1996. The track starts from behind the shelter and heads up the wide path past the gate. For the first hour and a half or so, conditions underfoot are good, with the path continuing up on to an atmospheric ridge covered in beech forest, and then up to the Mt Arthur Hut, which is situated on the bushline.

You can of course overnight in the hut if you want to break the journey, but Gordons Pyramid can be bagged in a return day tramp.

Follow the signpost to Mt Arthur Trig and leave the Mt Arthur Hut clearing. Almost immediately afterwards, you need to head up to the left on to the top of the ridge that leads towards Mt Arthur. The signposts here only point to Flora Hut and back to Mt Arthur Hut, neither of which you want to go to, so follow the poles up the ridge instead. For the next couple of hours, continue to follow the poles and cairns along the ridge, and you will eventually come to a signposted intersection. The signpost here indicates the way down across Horseshoe Basin and over to Gordon’s Pyramid.

Follow the route which drops into Horseshoe Basin, then up on to the ridge that leads to the top of Gordons Pyramid (1489 m). At the top there are great views of the surrounding Mt Arthur Range and Tablelands. It should take approximately 3 hours to walk from Mt Arthur Hut to the top of Gordons Pyramid.

Return the way you came via Mt Arthur Hut and back to Flora Carpark. The entire return day trip should take around 9 hours.

Height Profile

Gordons Pyramid-2d.jpg

Weather and Webcam Links

External Links

References

Daywalks-cover.jpg Day Walks in New Zealand: 100 Great Tracks (Bird’s Eye Guides), Shaun Barnett, Craig Potton Publishing (2007), See pages 107-107

Flagstaff

The residents of Dunedin are blessed with living in a hilly city, and a short walk to the summit of Flagstaff is an excellent way to survey the local landscape. The track to Flagstaff is part of an old bullock and stock trail over the tussock hills. Due to mist it was easy to get lost, so flagstaffs were erected to mark the track, and the name has stuck.

List Status Official
Elevation 668?m?(2,192?ft)
Location/List South Island, New Zealand
Region Otago/Southland
Location Coordinates 45? 49′ 58″ S, 170? 27′ 58″ E
Nearest Town/s Dunedin
Recommended Route
Duration Help.gif 1 hour (return)
Distance 3.4?km?(2.1?mi)
Start/End Points Flagstaff Whare Flat Rd
Difficulty Help.gif Easy
Track conditions Help.gif Track
Season Help.gif All year
Sights Views of Dunedin
Hazards Mud , occasional snow in winter

Getting There

By Car

From Dunedin, head up Stuart St, and then on to Taieri Rd. Taieri Rd turns into Three Mile Rd. Turn right into Flagstaff – Whare Flat Rd. head up the gravel road until to come to the ‘Bull Ring’ carpark.

Google Earth Map

NZ Topographic Map

Our Recommended Route

The track to Flagstaff is generally well maintained, and begins by climbing through an area of manuka scrub. As you climb higher, the scrub gives way to tussock and flax, and you will get views of the Taieri Plain and Mosgiel. After veering to the left, the track climbs up and navigates its way through rcky volcanic outcrops as it nears the summit. At the summit there is a plane table, and the rocks can provide a little shelter if windy.

From the summit, you can either return the way you came, or continue over Knoll top, and down Pineapple Track to Booth Rd.

Height Profile

Flagstaff-2d.jpg

Weather and Webcam Links

External Links

References

A Walking Guide to Dunedin – Detailed Maps and Directions for 13 Walks, First Edition 2002, Silver Peaks Press.

Cargill, Mt

Mt Cargill is an easily accessible peak from Dunedin City. The mountain can be approached from a number of directions, including walking from Bethunes Gully or via Mt Cargill Road and the impressive Organ Pipes rock formation (both about 4 hours return). On a fine day there are views of Otago Harbour and Dunedin.

List Status Official
Elevation 676?m?(2,218?ft)
Location/List South Island, New Zealand
Region Otago/Southland
Location Coordinates 45? 48′ 47″ S, 170? 33′ 18″ E
Nearest Town/s Dunedin
Geology Volcano
Recommended Route
Duration Help.gif 4 hours (return)
Distance 3.4?km?(2.1?mi)
Start/End Points Mt Cargill Road or Bethunes Gully
Difficulty Help.gif Easy
Track conditions Help.gif Track
Season Help.gif All year
Sights Views of Otago Harbour and Dunedin, Organ Pipes
Hazards Rocky cliffs, exposed to coastal weather

Getting There

By Car

To get to Mt Cargill Road

From Dunedin, drive north on George Street to the Gardens and turn left into North Road. Follow North Road and turn right up the hill at the Normanby Tavern. Climb up the road until you reach a fork and take the sharp left hand turn. Continue to the Peninsula Lookout (which you pass) and on to the Organ Pipes carpark.

To get to Bethunes Gully

From Dunedin, drive north on George Street to the Gardens and turn left into North Road. Follow North Road until the road turns right, then continue up the valley by Norwood Street. Turn left into Bethunes Gully, and travel a short way down a gravel drive to the carpark.

Google Earth Map

NZ Topographic Map

Our Recommended Route

From Mt Cargill Road via the Organ Pipes

Start from the Organ Pipes carpark on Mt Cargill Road. The track zig zags up through bush along the side of the hillside, and is consequently nice and cool in hot weather! Eventually you reach a spot along the track where you can get a good view of the Organ Pipes formation, and further on you can get a bit closer to them. The Organ Pipes are an impressive example of columnar jointed basalt (volcanic rock). When the volcanic rock cooled at the time, it cracked along long joints and consequently looks much like organ pipes standing up. Ocassionally rocks will tumble down, so be careful and don’t walk out underneath the Organ Pipes themselves!

Continue along the track toward Mt Cargill. The track crosses a boggy saddle between Mt Holmes and Buttars Peak. Eventually you emerge on to a saddle between Buttars Peak (which you can also bag if you feel inclined!) and the main summit. Here the track also meets the track coming from the Bethunes Gully. Follow the track up the north side of the Mountain until you meet the AH Reed Track and get to the summit. A return trip from Mt. Cargill Road takes about 4 hours.

From Bethunes Gully

From Bethunes Gully, begin walking on the track which goes to the left of the picnic area. The track follows Lindsay Creek for a way and then crosses it. You then head into pine plantation and native bush as the track ascends. Climb to a gully with a bridge and a small waterfall. Shortly after this you’ll come across a small loop track with a resting spot, and a view of Mt Cargill. After a rest (if you desire!) continue along the main track which continues up toward Mt Cargill. The track eventually sidles along one side of the Mt Cargill itself and emerges on to a saddle between Buttars Peak (which you can also bag if you feel inclined!) and the main summit. Here the track also meets the track coming from the Organ Pipes. Follow the track up the north side of Mt Cargill until you meet the AH Reed Track and get to the summit. A return trip from Bethunes Gully takes about 4 hours.

Height Profile

Cargill, Mt-2d.jpg

Weather and Webcam Links

External Links

References

A Walking Guide to Dunedin – Detailed Maps and Directions for 13 Walks, First Edition 2002, Silver Peaks Press.

?

Bradley, Mt

Mt Bradley

Mt Bradley is one of the many peaks located on the old volcanic landscape of Banks Peninsula. A trip to Mt Bradley can be completed as part of a longer walk which also takes in Mt Herbert or a shorter return walk to the mountain itself. The area is convenient to the Chrischurch urban area.

List Status Official
Elevation 855?m?(2,805?ft)
Location/List South Island, New Zealand
Region Canterbury
Location Coordinates 43? 41′ 42″ S, 172? 42′ 36″ E
Nearest Town/s Christchurch
Range Banks Peninsula Summit
Geology Volcano
Recommended Route
Duration Help.gif 4-7 hours (return or one-way, depending on the track taken)
Distance 10.0?km?(6.2?mi)
Start/End Points Kaituna Valley, Gebbies Pass, Diamond Head, Orton Bradley
Difficulty Help.gif Easy
Track conditions Help.gif Track, Marked Route
Season Help.gif All year, closed for lambing August-October
Sights Views around Banks Peninsula, Lyttleton Harbour, Southern Alps, the ‘Remarkable Dykes’
Hazards Mist , Steep bluffs

Getting There

By Car

There are numerous starting points for hiking up Mt Bradley, including Kaituni Valley, Gebbies Pass, Orton Bradley Park, or Diamond Harbour.

To start from Kaituna Valley, take SH 75 from Christchurch, and then turn left up Kaituna Valley Rd.

If starting from Gebbies Pass, drive from Christcurch via Governors Bay and at Teddington turn right to reach Gebbies Pass. To get to either Orton Bradley Park or Diamond Harbour, drive from Christcurch via Governors Bay and at Teddington turn left and continue around the Coast until you reach these locations.
Public Transport

If starting or finishing from Diamond Harbour, Black Cat Cruisesrun a regular ferry service from Lyttleton to Diamond Harbour.

Google Earth Map

NZ Topographic Map

Our Recommended Route

A trip up Mt Bradley can be completed via a number of different routes, and could also be combined with a walk to the summit of Mt Herbert. The routes are as follows:

  • Return walk from Kaituna Valley, via Packhorse Hut: 4-5 hours return (closed for lambing Aug ? Oct).

DOC Description: “This track is well sign-posted and passes the farm, following vehicle tracks up a bush-filled valley before climbing onto a big spur. It then follows the spur for some distance before reaching a farm track past Parkinsons Bush Reserve. This leads to the saddle and historic stone hut, well situated for the views.”

  • One-way walk from Gebbies Pass, via Packhorse Hut, Mt Herbert, and finish at Diamond Harbour: 5-6 hours

This route takes in both Mt Bradley and Mt Herbert. As it is one-way, you will need arrange transport at the end of the walk (e.g. have someone to pick you up, or take the ferry back to Lyttleton). After starting at Gebbies Pass, follow the track to the Packhorse Hut. From Packhorse Hut, the track angles up Mt Bradley (855 m). Do not attempt to go up if it is misty as there are bluffs on the Lyttleton side of Mt Bradley. Continue on to Mt Herbert, via a saddle and a Day Shelter. Mt Herbert is the highest point on Banks Peninsula at 920 m.

Views from Mt Bradley and Mt Herbert extend from Lyttleton Harbour and Banks Peninsula through to the Southern Alps. From Mount Herbert continue directly down to Diamond Harbour to complete the walk.

Of course, you could also simply return from either of the peaks and make this a return walk also.

  • Return or loop walk from Orton Bradley Park to Mt Bradley, and return via same route or alternative track back to Orton Bradley Park: 5-7 hours.

A trip directly to Mt Bradley can be conducted from the track beginning at Orton Bradley Park. From the Tableland Track climb up toward the Packhorse Hut. Once reaching Packhorse Hut, follow the follow the track that angles up Mt Bradley. Eventually the track comes to a saddle between Mt Bradley and Mt Herbert and you meet another track that takes you back to back to Orton Bradley.
The DOC Banks Peninsula Conservation Walks brochure outlines some of the options for walking on Banks Peninsula.

Route Options

The DOC Banks Peninsula Conservation Walks brochure outlines a variety of options for walking on Banks Peninsula.

Height Profile

Bradley, Mt-2d.jpg

Weather and Webcam Links

External Links

References

South island weekend tramps-cover.jpg South Island Weekend Tramps (Bird’s Eye Guides), Nick Groves, Craig Potton Publishing, 2003, See pages 94-96

Banks Peninsula – A Guide to the Bays and Beaches, All Walking Tracks, Mark Pickering, Mark Pickering Publishing, 1999, pp 15-16.

?

Botanical Hill

Summit of Botanical Hill

At only 147m, Botanical Hill is one of the smallest peaks on our list, and is positively tiny compared with many other South Island summits. However, as well as being a pleasant and easy walk located in the centre of Nelson, it has a peculiar claim to fame. The summit of Botanical Hill has a monument celebrating its claim of being the geographical centre of New Zealand. In fact, the true geographical centre of New Zealand is said to be 55km southwest in the Spooner Range, but Botanical Hill retains this honour due the fact it had the first trig station in the South Island, and further surveying radiated from this point. Botanical Hill also provides great views over Nelson and the surrounding area. (And it’s a great little peak for warming up the muscles ready for higher peaks further south!)

List Status Official
Elevation 147?m?(482?ft)
Location/List South Island, New Zealand
Region Nelson/Marlborough
Location Coordinates 41? 16′ 22″ S, 173? 17′ 58″ E
Nearest Town/s Nelson
Geology Sedimentary
Recommended Route
Duration Help.gif 1 hour (return)
Distance 1.6?km?(1?mi)
Start/End Points Cnr of Milton St and Hardy St East
Difficulty Help.gif Easy
Track conditions Help.gif Path
Season Help.gif All year
Sights Views , ‘Geographic Centre of New Zealand’, views of Nelson, plane table

Getting There

By Car or Walking

If you are staying in central Nelson accommodation, the start point for Botanical Hill is within walking distance. Simply follow Hardy or Bridge Streets to their eastern ends, and you will reach the sports fields of Botanical Reserve. The walk starts near the signposts and informational panels at the far side of the playing fields. There is also parking available in this area, on the roadside.

Public Transport

If you’re located further out of the Nelson CBD, you can use the Nelson bus service to get into town – see the Nelson Coacheswebsite. The Double Decker tourist bus also stops right outside the Botanical Reserve – see the Nelson City Council Double Decker Bus page.

There are also taxi companies in Nelson which can drop you off.

Google Earth Map

NZ Topographic Map

Our Recommended Route

The short walk up Botanical Hill begins from the Botanical Reserve sports fields, located at the corner of Milton St and Hardy St East. The rugby field here was host to the first ever game of rugby played in New Zealand. The game was played on 14th May 1870, between Nelson College and Nelson Rugby Football club.

After walking across this historic ground, the track to Botanical Hill begins from near the information panels. The path is wide and well formed, and simply zigzags up the hill, with signage to guide your way. It’s suitable for all fitness levels, and this is great summit for peak bagging novices.

Allow about 40 minutes to an hour for the return trip, though it’s easy to sit at summit for quite a while longer and study the geography of the Nelson area!

Images

700pxBotanicalhillnelson.jpg

700pxBotanicalhilltable.jpg

700pxBotanicalhillmapphoto.jpg

Weather and Webcam Links

External Links