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Messages - lloydy

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1
Rangitoto / Rangitoto kayak and tramp
« on: August 30, 2018, 04:23:32 PM »
Done the walk up Rangitoto several times in recent years, always after kayaking across and staying at the campsite at Motutapu.  Some great views from the top of Rangitoto when it's clear, both to the city, the Islands and distant Coromandel.
Well worth camping on Motutapu too, and a walk around the perimeter of this grassy island, beaches on the northern side.

2
General Discussion / Re: Mt Tauhara - Taupo
« on: August 08, 2010, 04:01:38 PM »
Hi Mike,

Did you notice any signs at the start of the track?   There used to be a slightly ambiguous one about access, however when I talked to trustees they were adamant access was not allowed.

Just wondered if anything had changed regarding the sign?

Yep, I recall there being a sign.  Certainly a well populated route.  Sadly the only 'peak' I managed last year due to annoying knee injury.

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General Discussion / Re: Auckland Volcanoes Circuit: Decision Required
« on: March 11, 2010, 02:46:09 PM »
browns island may have to be a no, no. no ferry there. only access by private boat

pigeon mtn and mt st johns all have access and naturally albert park, but surely can't class that as a peak. if you do there are plenty of other caldaras etc too!

Agreed on all counts - ok for my private family mission but probably not fair on a wider scale. I'm trying to remember what is in the centre of Albert Park, I think there is some form of memorial or fountain there? I think it is part of the well established Coast to Coast Walk also.

As an aside I'd like to Kayak to Brown Island some day as part of the bagging exercise - it seems reasonably achievable from Mission Bay / St Helliers.

Can't think of anything to merit the Pidgeon and St Johns inclusions.

A definite vote hear for Brown's Island, it's one of the few peaks I've done this summer as result of an ongoing annoying knee injury which is preventing me doing any recent cycling or walking for over 3 months now.  As a result I've started to get my sea kayak out lots more this summer. 

I was at the top of Brown's Island the other week in the middle of the tsunami warning having woken up on Motatapu where I kayaked to the previous day to find out about the tsunami warning.  No way was I going to kayak back to my destination Half Moon Bay in time for the forecasted tsunami which I had been told was 3 metres!  Made a few calls to discover that it was slightly earlier but only 1metre.  Anyway made it to Brown's Island in time to walk to the top and observe matters in the gulf. 
Abit of a non event thankfully (obviously not in Chile, where it was tragic) though I did experience some quicker but not high waves on the return from Brown's Island.

Anyway main point, definitely include Brown's Island, sure it's not tall but it's a great viewpoint and quite easy to reach in a kayak from Half Moons Bay/Bucklands Beach or St Helliers, less than a hour.  And I think it's possible to rent a kayak from the latter.

4
General Discussion / Re: Castle Rock Coromandel
« on: September 12, 2009, 04:09:37 PM »
I walked this distictive rock crag with Irma that I had wanted to summit for years. It is a bit of a drive through pine forrest to the starting point but well worth it. Height is 309 m and the walk is easy through forrest and then onto the top. The views are fantastic of the Coromandel Peninsula

Yes, a distinctive peak and despite it's lack of height, it's seen from many places in the Coromandel.  I posted a prev thread on it
http://www.peakbagging.co.nz/forums/index.php/topic,170.0.html

It's a tad higher than 309m though, height is according to Topo I've got is actually 531m, 309 is the gravel road it can be approached from.

5
Ben Lomond / Re: Ben Lomand - ex top of skyline gondola's
« on: March 15, 2009, 03:08:51 PM »
Also 'bagged' Ben Lomond a few weeks ago on my first visist to the South Island, coming off a wet Routeburn and then Caples trek.  Thankfully the weather was much improved for Ben Lomond and similar to the weather I recall experiencing walking up Ben Lomond in Scotland over 12 yrs ago and on one of first munros.

We started from Ben Lomond crescent, taking the forest road initially and then heading off on the signposted path which was easy to follow.  In good weather it's a fairly easy climb, and it took 2hrs 20mins to the summit. 

Just 5mins shy of the summit, the cloud started to come in and I thought we'd missed the views, but we hung around long enough there for it clear again for some stunning views.  Nice to have the others mountains marked out on the summit plaque.

6
Avalanche Peak / Great views on Avalanche Peak
« on: March 15, 2009, 11:43:13 AM »
Enjoyed some super views doing Avalanche Peak on my first trip to South Island a couple of weeks ago.

Did some great multi day walks in some mixed weather- didn't see much of the Routeburn :-( Caples was better, nearly got stranded on the Young-Wilkin having crossed a river to hut the prev eveining, heavy overnight rain made it virtually impossible to recross the next day (on 2nd attempt was only a few metres from the bank, but with it up to chest height, looking deeper and flowing fairly fast, we decided to turn back), luke warm hot pools on Cedar Flats before finishing with the Cass-Lagoon trip.

Anyway back on topic, did a there and back trip up Avanlanche Peak from Arthurs Pass village using Scotts Track.  In the right weather which it was for us, it's actually a straightforward trip, it took a fraction over 2hrs to the top from the village.  The routes clearly signposted through bush before emerging onto a ridge which is followed all the way to the top.  This section would be exposed to the wind, and last stretch after the steeper Avalanche Peak track joins from the left is a narrow ridge with drops to the right.

From the summit there is excellent views of the Mt Rollaston which has permanent snow glacier and other peaks, plus also across the pass to Mount Temple and others. 

It's well worth diverting to the impressive Devils Punchbowl Falls on the opposite side of the valley on the return, they come out of the sun's shadow in the early afternoon.

I've attached attached a few pics, really lucky with the weather, also a photo of a kea, of which they're were several around the summit area.

7
Ruapehu, Mt / Ruapehu - did it but ought to have read prev reports!
« on: February 12, 2009, 08:26:17 AM »
I did Ruapehu, at least to the Dome Summit on Waitangi day in mixed misty and cloudy but warm and still conditions.  I walked up from the Bruce Car Park to where the main ski lifts finish, but then went wrong following a path marked Skyline viewpoint, which ultimately led me to a steep narrow ridge surrounded by glacier snow on both sides, I retreated back and then followed the ski lifts further right (south) from the base station and eventually discovered a path that was much easier to follow.

At that stage I was chasing the rising clouds up the mountain.  On the summit did get great views of the crater lake and the main summit (proper ice axe and crampons and steely nerve would be needed for that even in mid summer).  Views elsewhere were limited by the cloud.  Going down was less eventful.

I had some super views of Ruapehu when walking in the Kaimanawa Forest Park the next two days.

I would certainly have benefited from reading the prev reports on here, and in particular the map with the route.  I had a printed Topo Map from the memorymap software but there's no patch marked at all, and the start's not signposted either unless I am mistaken.

8
Urchin / Re: Ridge between Umukarikari and Urchin
« on: February 10, 2009, 04:46:58 PM »
I presume this track is finished now, I noticed it when I was walking back from the Waipakihi hut along the river onto Urchin on sunday.  It was signposted from both sides (Urchin and Sharp Cone).

As you say it would make a potential excellent nearly round 1 day trip.  Nearly in that there's a 5 k hike between the two ends, it would be worth doing that first, as I did at the start of my two day hike. 

If the weather's right (it was for me see pics on the Umukarikari thread plus these) certainly some stunning views from the Umukarikari range.

I arrived at the hut early and with the great weather decided to hike up to junction top (1605m another potential peak?) on a track  not marked on the map, but clear at least as far as junction top which supposedly continues over the middle range - Te Raketuangiangi also 1605m,  an named 1660 peak, Thunderbolt 1633m and Motutere 1646m before descending to Waipakihi river (I saw the signpost by the river, it certainly wouldn't have been at all obvious without it, near the climb back up Urchin - also not obvious without the signpost!)

I wish I'd have known about this before, though it would definitely be a good weather route as you would be exposed to the elements all day and this would probably make a 2 1/2 day trip though.


9
Umukarikari / Re: Ridge between Umukarikari and Urchin
« on: February 10, 2009, 04:17:27 PM »
 I presume this track is finished now, I noticed it when I was walking along the Umukarikari range to Waipakihi hut on saturday.  It was signposted near Sharp Cone.

As you say it would make a potential excellent nearly round 1 day trip.  Nearly in that there's a 5 k hike between the two ends, it would be worth doing that first, as I did at the start of my two day hike. 

If the weather's right (it was for me see pics) certainly some stunning views from the Umukarikari range.

I arrived at the hut early and with the great weather decided to hike up to junction top (1605m another potential peak?) on a track  not marked on the map, but clear at least as far as junction top which supposedly continues over the middle range - Te Raketuangiangi also 1605m,  an named 1660 peak, Thunderbolt 1633m and Motutere 1646m before descending to Waipakihi river (I saw the signpost by the river, it certainly wouldn't have been at all obvious without it, near the climb back up Urchin - also not obvious without the signpost!)

I wish I'd have known about this before, though it would definitely be a good weather route as you would be exposed to the elements all day and this would probably make a 2 1/2 day trip though.

10
General Discussion / Re: Mt Moehau
« on: February 03, 2009, 04:17:43 PM »
The ranger at the pinnacles hut says its still possible to do. It's not a case of being allowed, just a case of having the navigation skills and determination.

He said the greatest issue is you can't really determine where the summit is being so flat and featureless on the top

Thanks for the reply, there's undoubtedly some great walking in NZ but at times access can be infuriatingly very restrictive, attached picture from the Hunua range at the weekend, a wide forest track leading from the Upper Mangatawhiri Dam across to the Ness Valley.  Needless to say I ignored this particular sign  :-X

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General Discussion / Re: Mt Moehau
« on: January 29, 2009, 04:45:19 PM »
Money.
There are actually a lot of tracks once you get off the tourist trail.
Ta, for the reply, so when a tracks closed a la Table Mountain, does that mean it's out of bounds or what.

I don't mind walking the less popular trails, but don't want to be getting into trouble doing so.  There's certainly an awful lot of 'private roads' when it comes to mountain biking.

12
Just back from a great weekend in the Taranaki area, did the organised road bike ride round the mountain on saturday, and then yesterday the summit from North Egmont visitors centre descending and contininung on the round the trip to Dawson Falls where I stayed before returning today for the long drive back.

Great weather for all, some super views from the summit, took about 3 1/2 hrs but certainly found the scree a long slog that's for sure.  I was hoping to continue down to Fantham's Peak and to Dawson Falls, but the snow was alittle too icy on the other side so decided not to chance it.

Some great views across to Ruapeha today too.

I'd echo much of the equipment list but would say boots aren't essential, it depends what you usually walk in, I found lightweight trainers more comfortable and feet certainly notice the difference after a long day.  I'm a trekking pole advocate though, I find they help to maintain a good rythem going up and lessen the weight on the knees on descents.
Waterwise, the more you carry the more you need! Though I ran out of water for the first time I recall towards the end of the day, think the camelback might have been leaking.

13
As an aside, to me compared to the wellington region, the coromandel peninsula is under represented. Another to consider is Kaitarakihi, a 852m peak accessed from the Hikuai-Kopu Road (SH25a). Probably will do that this weekend so will report.
Karangahake Mountain, Good pics there, must visit that one.

I found Kaitarakihi peak, off the Hikua - Kopu road alittle disappointing, as there were limited from the Top, as the Trig and summit have been totally overgrown with bush.  A pity as it is significantly higher than the Pinnacles.  There are occassional views through the bush, but I recall the view the view from the Pinnacles being more impressive (though many years since I did the latter).  There is a short chained section onto Kaitarakihi but otherwise it's an undulating track through the bush from the summit of the road.

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General Discussion / Re: Castle Rock
« on: January 16, 2009, 04:57:04 PM »
Hi Jon,
Yes, that description is pretty accurate, the pine forest described as actually been cut down recently so enhances the view somewhat on ascending Castle Rock Road itself leaving the main 309 road. 

It's fairly easy to find, it's signposted initially on another forest road on the right (if coming from the 309 side - as I say above the other side is currently closed) and it then leaves this road on an obvious path through the bush.

15
General Discussion / Castle Rock
« on: January 15, 2009, 04:08:14 PM »
How about adding Castle Rock on the Coromandel?  OK it's not far off the 309 gravel road and nearer still from the currently closed Castle Rock Road, but it's a very prominent landmark and there are great views from the top.

I did it over the xmas hols, cycling to it from the eastern Whitianga side, it's only a short hike, with just a short scramble to the top, but some steep cliffs on the northern side which I'd think ought to be popular with climbers.

As I say not high, but like say Suilven and Stac Polly in Scotland very prominent.  That said the view from the latter are incomparable really.

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