Author Topic: Maumaupaki (Camels Back)  (Read 3477 times)

Maumaupaki (Camels Back)
« on: November 15, 2010, 03:29:59 PM »
I noticed this peak listed as a possible, so that sounded like a good excuse to go out for a recce.

The track started off OK, but it gradually got harder to follow with the markers becoming a bit few and far between. By the time I got up higher, the clag rolled in which didn’t help either. There were some very promising looking high rocks enroute on which there would surely be great views, but I couldn’t see a thing in the cloud! Although the track was initially dry, it got boggier as I climbed and the bush covering the track got thicker and wetter. It got to the point of pretty much walking by braille – following the track with the feel of my feet as the shrubbery got so thick I could no longer see any sign of it in places! This would be a good warmup for anyone thinking of doing Table Mountain – only this does have a track, and views (well, probably).

After an hour (at about the half way point)  I realised that after wandering around in the clag looking for markers I had somehow done a 180 and had now been walking back the way I had come 300m (a long way in this terrain) without even knowing! By this time I was soaking wet, it was windy, and I was wondering why I was going to the top when I wasn’t going to see anything anyway. This was all the excuse I needed to simply keep going  back to the car.

This one definately needs a revisit though – but hopefully on a nicer day next time! Now on to Kaipawa...
« Last Edit: November 15, 2010, 03:36:31 PM by GuanoGerbil »
'There is always a risk in being alive, and if you are more alive, there is more risk' -Ibsen


Re: Maumaupaki (Camels Back)
« Reply #2 on: November 16, 2010, 04:00:42 AM »
I've just been speaking to DOC. Apparently the track was closed 10 years ago and all markers were removed due to the danger of steep drop offs which would have required hand holds to be put in.
That explains my experiences yesterday, and I'm now more keen than ever to have another go  ;D
A couple of pics I found on the net...
'There is always a risk in being alive, and if you are more alive, there is more risk' -Ibsen

Re: Maumaupaki (Camels Back)
« Reply #3 on: November 16, 2010, 07:26:41 AM »
load up the gps
pick a good day
take some ribbons
take a pruning saw

Re: Maumaupaki (Camels Back)
« Reply #4 on: November 17, 2010, 06:10:39 AM »
I've just been speaking to DOC. Apparently the track was closed 10 years ago and all markers were removed due to the danger of steep drop offs which would have required hand holds to be put in.
That explains my experiences yesterday, and I'm now more keen than ever to have another go  ;D
A couple of pics I found on the net...


That just makes it sound more intriguing!   ;D

Re: Maumaupaki (Camels Back)
« Reply #5 on: November 17, 2010, 03:36:49 PM »
I take it from your comment, Dodgy, that you'd be keen to join us? Sounds like a bit of you.
Vino, forget the pocket knife and bread crumbs - just make sure you bring your concrete pills (and bring some for me too this time)  ;D
'There is always a risk in being alive, and if you are more alive, there is more risk' -Ibsen

Re: Maumaupaki (Camels Back)
« Reply #6 on: November 21, 2010, 02:29:16 AM »
I take it from your comment, Dodgy, that you'd be keen to join us? Sounds like a bit of you.
Vino, forget the pocket knife and bread crumbs - just make sure you bring your concrete pills (and bring some for me too this time)  ;D


I'm always up for some off-the-beaten-track exploration. I work some strange (and long) hours however so may be difficult to co-ordinate.

Keep me in mind though whne you decide to launch another foray.

Re: Maumaupaki (Camels Back)
« Reply #7 on: November 29, 2010, 03:44:15 PM »
After my ‘difficulties’ last time, I was more determined than ever to knock this one off. No major difficulties this time around with the great visibility and a second pair of eyes in the form of Scott to keep me company.

The track was definitely there, but like last time it kept us on our toes trying to follow it through the relentless cutty grass once we got higher. It grew so thick that at one point I realised that I was missing my glasses – only to find that  the vegetation had somehow removed them from my face and attached them onto a strap on the back of my backpack! Another time I realised that my GPS was missing from my shoulder strap, only to find it hanging neatly on a tree behind me... very odd! My peaked cap proved useful to try and keep the nasty stuff out of my eyes, although of course this got removed a couple of times too.

We sidled around the left side of the first hump, passing one possible steep chute up before coming to a second one that looked more likely and marginally less steep. Indeed, a track of sorts appeared to head  in this direction so we decided to give this route up a go.
It started off pretty steep, which involved hauling on flax bushes whilst scrambling up an almost dry waterfall. The angle eventually eased and then we reached the saddle in between peaks. Turning left here soon brought us up to the ‘trig’. Well... a marker post to reassure that we were actually at the right spot. There was also a very old and slightly damp DOC logbook in a rusty post-box which was first signed in 1973. The last person to have signed the book was 4 years ago - gosh anyone would think this was a difficult place to get to  ;D

Only partial views from the summit, although there were some good ones at a few points earlier on the way.

The return down the steep descent was easier than anticipated and we only ‘explored alternative destinations’ a few times the rest of the way back. It took us just over 2 hours each way, with a total round trip time of 5 hours. It took us this long to walk a total of 6km’s! Needless to say, I wouldn’t recommend this for official peak status... but it's kind of fun in a sick sort of way.

« Last Edit: November 29, 2010, 03:57:41 PM by GuanoGerbil »
'There is always a risk in being alive, and if you are more alive, there is more risk' -Ibsen

Re: Maumaupaki (Camels Back)
« Reply #8 on: February 17, 2011, 03:34:47 AM »
Sounds like a great trip. Was disappointed I couldn't make it. Will have to give it a go at a later date.   ;D

Re: Maumaupaki (Camels Back)
« Reply #9 on: February 12, 2013, 09:08:44 AM »
Finally made it here. Trying to think of a reason to do it. There are none, which makes a good reason. We made a movie to show you all what you are missing  ;D

www.youtube.com/watch?v=Vqt1MrxgEb0

Re: Maumaupaki (Camels Back)
« Reply #10 on: February 12, 2013, 09:49:45 AM »
After Vinodrinker foolishly enquired about this peak, I thought a return trip to call on Alice the Camel sounded like a fun family day out. After all, it's only a 5km round trip - how hard could it be, right?  ;D

In fact, it's obviously such a popular walk that we even found an alternative track on the way back which made a nice scenic loop. Highly recommended. So much so, that I think the others were a little disappointed when the call was made to bush bash our way back to the other track - we were all really just starting to enjoy the crawling.  The clambering over/under/falling through the prickly scrub added some well enjoyed variety before reaching the welcoming embrace of the beloved cutty grass on the other track. In fact, we had so much fun that it we didn't want to leave and so didn't get back to the car until 7 hours later. Our average travel rate of 0.7km/hour shows just how much we revelled in this unique delight and wanted to prolong the pleasure as long as possible.

If there was a trig on the top, I wouldn't hesitate recommending this for official status  ;)
'There is always a risk in being alive, and if you are more alive, there is more risk' -Ibsen