Stokes, Mt

Mt Stokes is the highest point in the Marborough Sounds and offers 360 degree views of the surrounding area including Charlotte and Pelorous Sounds. The walk to the top takes about half a day and is accessible by driving from the town of Picton.

List Status Official
Elevation 1,203 m (3,947 ft)
Location/List South Island, New Zealand
Region Nelson/Marlborough
Location Coordinates 41° 5′ 26″ S, 174° 6′ 6″ E
Nearest Town/s Picton
Recommended Route
Duration Help.gif 5-6 hours (return)
Distance 6.4 km (4 mi)
Start/End Points Titirangi Road
Difficulty Help.gif Medium
Track conditions Help.gif Track
Season Help.gif All year
Sights 360 views of Marlborough Sounds
Hazards Inclement weather

Getting There

By Car

From Picton drive down Queen Charlotte Drive as far as Linkwater. From Linkwater, turn into Kenepuru Road which you should follow as far as the head of Kenepuru Sound. From the head of Kenepuru Sound, turn on to Titirangi Road. Follow the road as far as Okoha Saddle, where you begin the walk.

Public Transport

It is possible to access Mt Stokes by taking a water taxi from Picton to Endeavor Inlet and beginning your walk from the Antimony Mines track, however this makes a very long day walk and should only be attempted by very fit walkers.

Google Earth Map

NZ Topographic Map

Our Recommended Route

From Okoha Saddle commence the walk up Mt Stokes. The track leads uphill through beech forest. Continue steadily upwards for about 2 hours until the forest thins, and eventually the vegetation becomes more subalpine in nature (tussock and alpine plants). Soon after the change in vegetation you reach the summit where you are rewarded with great views of the Marborough Sounds, including the Queen Charlotte and Pelorous Sounds. Return the way you came to meet back up with your car. The return trip should take about 5-6 hours.

Height Profile

Stokes, Mt-2d.jpg

Weather and Webcam Links

External Links

References

Daywalks-cover.jpg Day Walks in New Zealand: 100 Great Tracks(Bird’s Eye Guides), Shaun Barnett, Craig Potton Publishing (2007), See pages 112-112